Feriatus

"Outside of a dog, a book is a man's best friend.
Inside of a dog, it's too dark to read." -Groucho Marx

Mandatory reading for every whiner that thinks the internet is making us stupid.  (via Far from messing with our brains, the internet has set our minds free - Telegraph)
eadfrith:

The Alphonso Psalter - folio 12r
A Stag fighting a magnificent winged Dragon - on the back of another Dragon!!
Sometimes known as the Tenison Psalter.  Origin is likely Westminster or London, England - Dated to 1284-1316
Add MS 24686; Images from the British Library Manuscript Website.
http://www.bl.uk/manuscripts/FullDisplay.aspx?ref=Add_MS_24686

eadfrith:

The Alphonso Psalter - folio 12r

A Stag fighting a magnificent winged Dragon - on the back of another Dragon!!

Sometimes known as the Tenison Psalter.  Origin is likely Westminster or London, England - Dated to 1284-1316

Add MS 24686; Images from the British Library Manuscript Website.

http://www.bl.uk/manuscripts/FullDisplay.aspx?ref=Add_MS_24686

(via sexycodicology)

uispeccoll:

Need to brush up on your 18th century Italian water laws? If so, check out this 1771 copy of Metodo in Practica di Sommario… If nothing else it has some great illustrations! [H.H.C. fHD1697 I8 R6 1771] #uiowa #specialcollections #libraries #rarebooks #italy #italianliterature #waterlaws #hydraulics #griffins #mythologicalbeasts #illustrations

uispeccoll:

Need to brush up on your 18th century Italian water laws? If so, check out this 1771 copy of Metodo in Practica di Sommario… If nothing else it has some great illustrations! [H.H.C. fHD1697 I8 R6 1771] #uiowa #specialcollections #libraries #rarebooks #italy #italianliterature #waterlaws #hydraulics #griffins #mythologicalbeasts #illustrations

wordpainting:

Ye olde books

wordpainting:

Ye olde books

(Source: slightlyignorant, via breathingbooks)

All Mendelssohn, all night!

(Source: Spotify)

kathaderon:

Goethe’s Faust - illustrated by Harry Clarke.

I have another even prettier version here. (If you’re going to mortgage your soul, don’t do it cheaply.)

Mephistopheles still owes me a Marlowe version to complete the Triumvirate.

(via booklover)

bookslooks:

Here, have yet another photo of my bookshelf.


Now that’s a fine bookshelf!

bookslooks:

Here, have yet another photo of my bookshelf.

Now that’s a fine bookshelf!

(via bookoisseur)

bookavore:

Every year I look forward to the Tournament of Books for several reasons, but primarily because it forces me to read a book I’ve had on the pile for ages. As the ToB has come to an end this week, that book has been The People in the Trees by Hanya Yanagihara, at first because of its bracket-busting abilities. Any book that could potentially be better than Life After Life and The Goldfinch seemed like a good choice. And: wow! Was it ever!
I like nothing more than being surprised by a book, and this book surprised me on multiple fronts. I finished it this morning, and was stunned into staring out the train window at the sunrise. As both judgments linked above make clear, Yanagihara is a spectacular writer. What’s impressive beyond her obvious ability, though, is her ability to write in the pompous voice of a horrible person while simultaneously skewering that person, all without her beautiful descriptions of a heartbreakingly fictional time and location feeling out of place. Further, though she builds up tension so subtly that I’m not sure I’d be able to expect it on a re-read, that tension strengthens to the point of near breath-holding in the final sections.
Life After Life came back in the Zombie Round and beat it, and I can see why—though this book is incredible, I think Life was a masterpiece. But it’s fitting, because this book reminds me, in spirit, of Atkinson’s debut novel, Behind the Scenes at the Museum. It is similarly audacious, and has inspired a similar devotion: I will read anything Yanagihara writes moving forward, as I do for Atkinson. 

Thoughtful commentary, love this!

bookavore:

Every year I look forward to the Tournament of Books for several reasons, but primarily because it forces me to read a book I’ve had on the pile for ages. As the ToB has come to an end this week, that book has been The People in the Trees by Hanya Yanagihara, at first because of its bracket-busting abilities. Any book that could potentially be better than Life After Life and The Goldfinch seemed like a good choice. And: wow! Was it ever!

I like nothing more than being surprised by a book, and this book surprised me on multiple fronts. I finished it this morning, and was stunned into staring out the train window at the sunrise. As both judgments linked above make clear, Yanagihara is a spectacular writer. What’s impressive beyond her obvious ability, though, is her ability to write in the pompous voice of a horrible person while simultaneously skewering that person, all without her beautiful descriptions of a heartbreakingly fictional time and location feeling out of place. Further, though she builds up tension so subtly that I’m not sure I’d be able to expect it on a re-read, that tension strengthens to the point of near breath-holding in the final sections.

Life After Life came back in the Zombie Round and beat it, and I can see why—though this book is incredible, I think Life was a masterpiece. But it’s fitting, because this book reminds me, in spirit, of Atkinson’s debut novel, Behind the Scenes at the Museum. It is similarly audacious, and has inspired a similar devotion: I will read anything Yanagihara writes moving forward, as I do for Atkinson. 

Thoughtful commentary, love this!

In the mid-1920′s the publisher R. R. Donnelley asked Kent if he would have an interest in illustrating an edition of Richard Henry Dana, Jr.’s Two Years Before the Mast. Kent had a better idea, how about illustrating Moby-Dick instead.

The rest is history. It was first published in 1930 in a three-volume limited edition of 1000 copies by the Lakeside Press of Chicago, which sold out immediately, and then followed by a trade edition from Random House.

The book became and remains a high-spot of 20th century illustration.
 (via In The Stacks: Rockwell Kent at the Smithsonian Archives of American Art - Book Patrol)
inacom:

Bibliothèque nationale de France, Français 22971, f. 60v (Sri Lanka). Secrets de l’histoire naturelle. Cognac, c1480-1485. Artist: Robinet Testard. snail houses.


Because, why not?

inacom:

Bibliothèque nationale de France, Français 22971, f. 60v (Sri Lanka). Secrets de l’histoire naturelle. Cognac, c1480-1485. Artist: Robinet Testard. snail houses.

Because, why not?

(via sexycodicology)

eadfrith:

Historiated initial P from The Rochester Bible.
Manuscript made in England - date 1175, possibly the Cathedral priory of St Andrew, Rochester.
Royal MS 1 C VII; Images from the British Library Manuscript Website
http://www.bl.uk/manuscripts/FullDisplay.aspx?ref=Royal_MS_1_c_vii

eadfrith:

Historiated initial P from The Rochester Bible.

Manuscript made in England - date 1175, possibly the Cathedral priory of St Andrew, Rochester.

Royal MS 1 C VII; Images from the British Library Manuscript Website

http://www.bl.uk/manuscripts/FullDisplay.aspx?ref=Royal_MS_1_c_vii

(via sexycodicology)

erikkwakkel:

Circular song
Medieval music books, with their merry notes jumping off the page, are a pleasure to look at. This sensational page from the 14th century adds to this experience in a most unusual manner. It presents a well-known song, the French ballade titled En la maison Dedalus (In the house of Dedalus), be it that the scribe decided to write both music and lyrics in a circular form. There is reason behind this madness. The maze created by music and words locks up the main character of the song, the mythological figure Ariadne, who is a prisoner in the house of Daedalus - she is represented by the red dot. The book contains treatises on music theory, notation, tuning and chant. In other words, it was meant for experts readers. The beholder likely enjoyed the challenge of singing a circular song (did he or she spin the book around?) and how it held its subject hostage in the merriest of ways.
Pic: Berkeley, Music Library, MS 744 (made in Paris in 1375). More about the manuscript here, including more unusual images. This is a study of the book (the ballade is discussed at p. 14).

erikkwakkel:

Circular song

Medieval music books, with their merry notes jumping off the page, are a pleasure to look at. This sensational page from the 14th century adds to this experience in a most unusual manner. It presents a well-known song, the French ballade titled En la maison Dedalus (In the house of Dedalus), be it that the scribe decided to write both music and lyrics in a circular form. There is reason behind this madness. The maze created by music and words locks up the main character of the song, the mythological figure Ariadne, who is a prisoner in the house of Daedalus - she is represented by the red dot. The book contains treatises on music theory, notation, tuning and chant. In other words, it was meant for experts readers. The beholder likely enjoyed the challenge of singing a circular song (did he or she spin the book around?) and how it held its subject hostage in the merriest of ways.

Pic: Berkeley, Music Library, MS 744 (made in Paris in 1375). More about the manuscript here, including more unusual images. This is a study of the book (the ballade is discussed at p. 14).

(via sexycodicology)

Fact: No day that ends with Corelli is a complete loss.

(Source: Spotify)

The craziest thing about tallying the drinks in these stories is that it hardly does the drinking justice. Half the time, stories begin with “another drink” and leave you with the notion that everyone just kept drinking non-stop. Sometimes the amount someone had to drink isn’t even measured by glasses but by showing someone so piss drunk that they fall smack over a coffee table, drink in hand (which happens in “Vitamins”).
 (via Raymond Carver by the Drink - Book Patrol)